Career In Jewelery Designing

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Career In Jewelery Designing

Its one of the emerging trend in professional education, As the growing market in the world of ornaments there need a skilled personal who have new idea and new prospective we here stats with the past of jewelry how it come into existence how its name derived.

HISTORY: The word jewellery is derived from the word jewel, which was anglicized from the Old French "jouel" in around the 13th century. Further tracing leads back to the Latin word "jocale", meaning plaything. Jewellery is one of the oldest forms of body adornment; recently found 100,000 year-old nassarius shells that were made into beads are thought to be the oldest known jewellery.
Although in earlier times jewellery was created for more practical uses, such as wealth storage and pinning clothes together, in recent times it has been used almost exclusively for decoration. The first pieces of jewellery were made from natural materials, such as bone, animal teeth, shell, wood, and carved stone. Jewellery was often made for people of high importance to show their status and, in many cases, they were buried with it.

Jewelery Design At The Closet: It is no longer a cloistered trade carried out by semi-literate goldsmiths in family vaults, passed down like a well-kept secret from generation to generation. Instead, thanks to the advances in technology, it has landed on the drawing board with some firms even using computer-aided designs to create exquisite pieces in virtual reality.
Along with the technological finesse has come a paradigm shift: Jewellery is no longer purchased with only the intrinsic value of gold in mind. The working woman wants trendy and functional trinkets, which can be worn at office, at home and on outings. Says Manikchand, who has been associated with his family jewellery business for two decades, The needs of the working women have largely influenced the worldwide trend in jewellery. On the one hand, a working woman wants to make a fashion statement and, on the other hand, she wants trinkets for regular wear. That in turn has spawned a lifestyle industry and demand for jewellery designers.
Technological Finesse: Jewellery is no longer purchased with only the intrinsic value of gold in mind. The working woman wants trendy and functional trinkets, which can be worn at office, at home and on outings.The needs of the working women have largely influenced the worldwide trend in jewellery. On the one hand, a working woman wants to make a fashion statement and, on the other hand, she wants trinkets for regular wear. That in turn has spawned a lifestyle industry and demand for jewellery designers.
There are several institutes offering long-term, short-term and distance learning courses in jewellery designing. Here, the students not only hone their designing skills, but also learn to use a jewelers tools and pick up rudimentary skills like casting, stone cutting, engraving and polishing. They also learn special skills like electroplating, metal colouring, anodising, enamelling, stone setting and silversmithing.
The Delhi-based National Institute of Fashion Technology, the Noida-based JDTI, the Mumbai-based Gemmological Institute of India, the Chennai-based Dr Dhamambal Government Polytechnic for Women and the Surat-based Diamond Institute of India are offering jewellery designing and allied courses.
The Gemological Institute, for instance, is also offering courses in pearl identification and stringing, jewellery casting, diamond grading and gemology. The Chennai-based polytechnic, which has executed a joint project with the World Gold Council, is offering courses in Gold smithing and stone setting. The Surat-based Indian Diamond Institute is conducting PG Diploma and certificate courses in diamonds, coloured gemstones and machine cast jewellery.
The JDTI, which happens to be a division of Silver Smith India Ltd, is also offering an Industrial Jewellery Design Solutions certificate programme in Jewellery Retailing of 45 days. The institute also provides six to eight weeks internship to students enrolled in the two-year programme. The fee for a two-year course is Rs. 1.80 lakh and for the short-term courses between Rs. 10,000-15,000. Says Narula, "The JDTI educates and trains people in all aspects of jewellery designing and manufacturing. The underlying principle is: If you cant make jewellery, you cant design jewellery".
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